"THE REAL STEP FORWARD IS TO FLY LESS, EAT LESS, DRIVE LESS, AND CONSUME LESS"? Less is more? I don’t think so.

A new type of capitalist activist, the Charles Dickens of futurism, Gerd Leonhard is a green futurist with a focus on media, content, entertainment and publishing, technology, telecom as well as marketing, branding and communications. His new direction: sustainability, carbon reduction, alternative and renewable energies, the future of transportation. He is a highly influential keynote speaker, think-tank leader and advisor, and now, the Founder of GreenFuturists.com using formidable talents to focus on important issues. These days you will hear him talk about our current economic and a societal paradigm that is quickly becoming ill-suited to tackle the key challenges of the next 20-50 years.

The traditional focus on profit and growth has driven us to the top of the spiral (and the US is the global leader in that race), and we are hitting the ceiling: witness Occupy Wall Street and what is referred to as ‘the corporate spring’. In the next 20 years, he believes everything will be about sustainability, literally. “Like Richard Branson, I believe that ‘the right thing’ almost always results in win-win situations but it takes real leadership that can take a leap to sufficient longterm thinking to view things beyond the quarterly stock market marathons,” he says.

Audi spends much of their R&D budget in building self-driving cars, going beyond the current car ideology and yes, it will be electric, too. Virgin Airlines is switching to bio fuel. But, Gerd says the main challenge arises is when a sustainable way does not actually make more short-term profits such as with airlines having cheaper fuel options. After all, the real step forward is to fly less, eat less, drive less and consume less.

The business case for that can only be seen in context with what everyone else is doing. And of the future: Gerd believes that if we do not stop borrowing from our own future, and if we do not start paying the real price for what our ever-increasing consumption actually costs, we have a very good chance at losing everything we value, today, in the next 20-50 years,” he says. “We may lose our oceans, our forests, our glaciers, our rivers, our wildlife, our breathable air and our clean water – and this is not a world that I want my children, or grand-children, to live in.” Predicting the future: every single consumer now wants to be able to like brands – and that means brands have to become likeable, real, trust-worthy, transparent… and do more common good. The cost for not having a sustainable approach will explode, whether it is operating costs, taxes, or the penalties other companies will assess you if you look less ‘good’ and less proactive. Gerd believes that in less than 18 months, every single public official, most business men, all politicians and all leaders will be judged on their position on sustainability, renewable energy, environment and ‘green business’.

"

Futurist Dennis Walsh writes a very nice summary of what I try to do as GreenFuturist.  Thanks!!!

(via greenfuturist)

Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta

(via futuristgerd)

"

AFRICA, THE FASTEST GROWING CONTINENT BY POPULATION - IS THIS THE NEXT EMERGENG MARKET?

Over the past decade six of the world’s ten fastest-growing countries were African. In eight of the past ten years, Africa has grown faster than East Asia, including Japan. Even allowing for the knock-on effect of the northern hemisphere’s slowdown, the IMF expects Africa to grow by 6% this year and nearly 6% in 2012, about the same as Asia.

"

The hopeful continent: Africa rising | The Economist (via mediafuturist)

(via emergentfutures)

PRETTY WILD.

emergentfutures:

The Future of the Book | IDEO

Paul Higgins: Some really interesting thoughts and concepts here. I was particularly taken by:

  • Nelson - the concept of combining the flow of current thoughts and stories on a subject with a deeper access to material and references.
  • Coupland (or Copeland) - This is an interesting way for people within an organisation to share material and reading. What interested me from a futurist perspective is that it may be a great way to identify blind spots in what an organisation is seeing. As well as showing what is popular, what is well read and what is shared we should be able to highlight what areas are not and use it as a diagnostic tool to improve the forward scanning processes of organisations. 

Tags: Future Books

IF YOU WANT TO BE CONTINOUSLY EMPLOYED IN THE FUTURE, YOU HAVE TO LEARN HOW TO LEARN SO YOU CAN ADAPT TO ACCELERATING CHANGE. 


emergentfutures:

55 Jobs of the Future



As a rule of thumb, 60% of the jobs 10 years from now haven’t been invented yet.

Full Story: FuturistSpeaker
IF YOU WANT TO BE CONTINOUSLY EMPLOYED IN THE FUTURE, YOU HAVE TO LEARN HOW TO LEARN SO YOU CAN ADAPT TO ACCELERATING CHANGE.

emergentfutures:

55 Jobs of the Future

As a rule of thumb, 60% of the jobs 10 years from now haven’t been invented yet.

Full Story: FuturistSpeaker

3D PRINTING … IT’S THE FUTURE. ACCEPT IT, LEARN IT, AND EMBRACE IT OR BE LEFT BEHIND!

futuramb:

Downloading — quite often stealing, in the eyes of the law — music, movies, books and photos is easier than bobbing for apples in a bucket without water. It has kept legions of lawyers employed fighting copyright violations without a whole lot to show for their efforts in the past decade. You think that was bad? Just wait until we can copy physical things. It won’t be long before people have a 3-D printer sitting at home alongside its old inkjet counterpart. These 3-D printers, some already costing less than a computer did in 1999, can print objects by spraying layers of plastic, metal or ceramics into shapes. People can download plans for an object, hit print, and a few minutes later have it in their hands. Call it the Industrial Revolution 2.0. Not only will it change the nature of manufacturing, but it will further challenge our concept of ownership and copyright. Suppose you covet a lovely new mug at a friend’s house. So you snap a few pictures of it. Software renders those photos into designs that you use to print copies of the mug on your home 3-D printer. Did you break the law by doing this? You might think so, but surprisingly, you didn’t.
(via Disruptions: The 3-D Printing Free-for-All - NYTimes.com)

3D PRINTING … IT’S THE FUTURE. ACCEPT IT, LEARN IT, AND EMBRACE IT OR BE LEFT BEHIND!

futuramb:

Downloading — quite often stealing, in the eyes of the law — music, movies, books and photos is easier than bobbing for apples in a bucket without water. It has kept legions of lawyers employed fighting copyright violations without a whole lot to show for their efforts in the past decade. You think that was bad? Just wait until we can copy physical things.

It won’t be long before people have a 3-D printer sitting at home alongside its old inkjet counterpart. These 3-D printers, some already costing less than a computer did in 1999, can print objects by spraying layers of plastic, metal or ceramics into shapes. People can download plans for an object, hit print, and a few minutes later have it in their hands.

Call it the Industrial Revolution 2.0. Not only will it change the nature of manufacturing, but it will further challenge our concept of ownership and copyright. Suppose you covet a lovely new mug at a friend’s house. So you snap a few pictures of it. Software renders those photos into designs that you use to print copies of the mug on your home 3-D printer.

Did you break the law by doing this? You might think so, but surprisingly, you didn’t.

(via Disruptions: The 3-D Printing Free-for-All - NYTimes.com)

PREDICTS WITHIN DECADE 40% OF OUR CURRENT JOBS WILL BE REPLACED BY TECHNOLOGY. YOU MUST LEARN HOW TO LEARN AND RELEARN TO KEEP UP OR YOU WILL BE REPLACED!

futuramb:

In his analysis, Mr Ford noted how technology and innovation improve productivity exponentially, while human consumption increases in a more linear fashion. In his view, Luddism was, indeed, a fallacy when productivity improvements were still on the relatively flat, or slowly rising, part of the exponential curve. But after two centuries of technological improvements, productivity has “turned the corner” and is now moving rapidly up the more vertical part of the exponential curve. One implication is that productivity gains are now outstripping consumption by a large margin.

Another implication is that technology is no longer creating new jobs at a rate that replaces old ones made obsolete elsewhere in the economy. All told, Mr Ford has identified over 50m jobs in America—nearly 40% of all employment—which, to a greater or lesser extent, could be performed by a piece of software running on a computer. Within a decade, many of them are likely to vanish. “The bar which technology needs to hurdle in order to displace many of us in the workplace,” the author notes, “is much lower than we really imagine.”

OK, now magazines like The Economist are stating this fact that we futurists have been talking about for many years, well maybe most early by Alvin Toffler… Is it time to leave these issues to the politicians and change our focus to things more far ahead into the future…?

SWEET! Take a Peek into the Future.

smarterplanet:

The Kinect Effect – goosebump-inducing manifesto for imagination in innovation, disguised as a spot for xbox   

via curiositycounts:

(Source: curiositycounts, via emergentfutures)

Tags: Future

CAN THE FUTURE BE PREDICTED?

futuramb:

BBC News - How to predict the future

However, there is an entire profession that takes a different view. For futurologists, or futurists as they often like to abbreviate themselves, there are patterns, rhythms, signs and pointers to the future that can be discerned and measured in the here and now.

“I think there is a false dichotomy between the idea that we can predict the future and the idea that we can’t,” says Oxford Professor Nick Bostrom, director of the Future of Humanity Institute.

“If you lift a cup of coffee to your mouth and drink from it, you are implicitly predicting that it is not poisoned or you won’t burn yourself. From there it is only a matter of degree to predict what the world may be like a thousand years from now or a million years from now.

“There is no sharp point at which things suddenly become unpredictable. It is just a probability distribution.”

A relatively balanced article by BBC about the work of futurists.

(via @rossdawson)

(via emergentfutures)

"He’s absolutely correct. Personal data, virtual currencies, reputation and influence will be the currency of the future! Pay attention. The future is accelerating.

Echoing this sentiment that value doesn’t necessarily equal money, media futurist Gerd Leonhard notably pointed to the harvesting of personal data as a future currency, in his keynote address to MIPCOM’s ultra-high-level Digital Minds Summit:

“In 2010, real money was still the main item of value exchanged for digital content and web services. By 2020, what can be defined as value will have expanded to embrace a much wider range of currencies, ranging from the audience’s time and attention, to virtual currencies, personal data and reputation or influence,” he said.

Food for thought…

"

Mipcom blog review of Digital Minds Summit

Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta

(Source: futuristgerd, via emergentfutures)

The Fuure of Marketing and Other Things. 


mediafuturist:

We are going from Empires to Networks, from EGO to ECO. In media, telecom, marketing, banking, energy. Big. Very big.
The Fuure of Marketing and Other Things.

mediafuturist:

We are going from Empires to Networks, from EGO to ECO. In media, telecom, marketing, banking, energy. Big. Very big.